Offshore Wind Power Has Potential and A Price Tag

Offshore Wind Power Has Potential and A Price Tag

Wind power developers eyeing California’s renewable energy market are literally floating a novel idea. Seattle-based Trident Winds has filed preliminary environmental documents for a farm of 100 floating wind turbines off California’s central coast, according to reporting this week by the San Jose Mercury News.

Trident Winds’ proposal is a longterm bet—startup is probably a decade away according to CEO Alla Weinstein—but it's a vision that sounds less and less like science fiction. Just last week Norwegian oil and gas giant Statoil gave the green light to what is likely to be the world’s first floating wind farm, with construction set to begin next year near Scotland; it is to be generating 30 megawatts (MW) of power by the end of 2017.

There is no doubt that California will need plenty of renewable energy as the state gears up to meet a new mandate requiring half of its power to be renewable by 2030. Less clear is whether it will be ready to stomach floating wind power's financial and maritime pricetag.

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